Tuesday, January 25, 2005

Irreligious intolerance in the EU


/ bull / papal /
I'm really not sure why the EU is worried about religious fundamentalism and freedom of speech in, say, Turkey, when as the above link demonstrates, (and this link as well), they should be doing something about the attitudes of existing member states....

3 comments:

Seesaw said...

Well, Turkish fundamentalism is something different, thinks EU. And I am affraid, Turkey will be even more under scrutiny now, then 3 or 5 years ago.

SOL said...

The sad fact remains that in Greece, the church establishment still has the power to armtwist the state into embarassing decisions: It avoided to condemn the Greek publisher, as that would be insane and threatening to basic liberties, but condemned the austrian creator (knowning that he couldn't be prosecuted) seeing to it for the priests' sake that some punishment was duly handed out.
(Greek)links on the decision and the background of the case:
http://www.dream.net.gr/modules.php?name=News&file=print&sid=1420
http://www.iospress.gr/ios2003/ios20031116a.htm

DoDo said...

These Islamophobes also should also note at last the inflow of creationism from the USA. They are now in the underground, but already numerous. Some people have the notion that somehow Europeans are intristically better than Europeans, but that of course is not true, and Christian fundamentalist sects can slowly but surely gain momentum just like they did in the USA - with political consequences.

So just because traditional churches have been weakened in most European countries, and snotty British, French or German Islamophobes haven't heard of the prevailing antics of the Greek, Austrian or Polish churches, doesn't mean problems lie only across the Bosphorus.